How Do You Measure Inclusion in the Workplace?

graph how to measure inclusion in the workplace

When it comes to hiring in the workplace, diversity is a rather easy area to measure. It’s not difficult to make goals and measure metrics to assure the Human Resources recruiters are hitting various targets.

On the other hand, measuring inclusion is far more difficult. In a sense, the only way to truly measure inclusion is by starting to have conversations with various teams at your company. From management down, ask questions and not only listen to answers, but create strategies to integrate new ideas for inclusionary practices into your company’s culture.

Asking these questions could include personal 1:1 meetings with teams and managers, managers sending out micro surveys to their teams, or by a companywide annual employee survey asking employees to share their opinions anonymously. Yes, you’ll have to ask the hard questions… so be ready to read what could be harsh responses. However, employee feedback is the only way to truly gauge if your company is doing its role to be part of the DEI solution, rather than adding to the problem.

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Help Make Inclusionary Language Accessible

two images of people smiling

Sticks & Stones May Break Your Bones, But WORDS Matter Too

There’s no doubt about it, some people think before speaking; their mind-to-mouth edit filter is in full functioning order, and some who suffer terribly from “open mouth, insert foot” syndrome. When this happens, it’s usually the listener who bears the brunt of the faux pas.

Since July is Disability Pride Month, we thought now would be a great time to look at how people communicate when talking about disabilities. Most people could use a refresher course in inclusionary language.

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Advocate for the Disability Community in New Jersey: Your Voice Matters

advocate for disability community

The COVID-19 pandemic hit the world hard. Life came to a screeching halt, and for almost two years everything we did, like how we work, our interactions, and even getting food and common household staples became challenges.

For the disability community, life became even harder and the world even narrower. Many with sensory conditions found themselves unable to wear masks and shop. People saw their services shuttered and their hard-won skill progression erode.

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Specialized Education Programs: How to Challenge AND Accommodate

Caregiver and Person receiving services

A Special Relationship with Special Education

When raising a child with an intellectual or developmental disability, it is essential to find the most suitable environment for them to receive the best education possible. Sometimes, a traditional approach to education can be the perfect option, but it’s important to know that it is not your ONLY option. There are many avenues to accomplish this: mainstreaming, specialized curriculums, and even schools tailored to meet the needs of particular disabilities. We spoke with Jacky Wilensky, a teacher at The Shore Center, a public school placement for students with autism, to learn more about what kinds of accommodations parents should consider to ensure a student’s educational success.

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A Big Win for Students With Disabilities at the Supreme Court!

Supreme Court Building IEP

Our latest blog topic comes to us from Hinkle, Fingles, Prior, & Fischer, a Jersey-based law firm that represents people with disabilities and their families in the tri-state area. They detailed a landmark decision handed down by the Supreme Court that affects how Individual Education Plans (IEP’s) are deemed “appropriate.”

As IEP’s begin to be set, we want to make sure you stay up-to-date on all the important issues so you’re able to effectively advocate for your loved ones.

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Quick Tips for Accessible Higher Education

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Apply Yourself!

By Elise Giacobbe

The college application process is stressful, frustrating and time-consuming for everyone. When you need to dig deeper into your research aside from major, location and the price of higher education, that is when things can get challenging. Research for families of people with disabilities and special needs doubles, if not triples. When selecting a school, you must carefully consider

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Tips To Avoid Back To School Bullying for Individuals With Special Needs and Disabilities

1It’s that time of year again, summer is officially over, and youth all across the country are now back to school.  For some parents, it’s a day that they were waiting for all summer, finally able to get their children out of their hair.  While for other parents, they have been dreading the day because of the chances that their child may be bullied in school.

Parents of youth living with special needs and disabilities, such as physical, developmental, intellectual, emotional, and sensory disabilities, may be at an increased risk of their child being bullied while at school.  While bullying may not seem like an issue to most parents, to a parent of child with a disability, it can be a big worry.  Ensure your loved one is not being bullied at school by following some of the tips below.

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